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  • dorishall posted an update 1 year, 3 months ago

    Many students are relieved to hear any final decision from a school to help them buy an essay online or decide where they will ultimately enroll, but hearing that you are on a school’s wait list may seem confusing. In order to make the best of the situation (and to help you get out of wait list limbo), here are some tips on how to react to being wait-listed.

    1. Prioritize your college list
    It is likely that you have applied to more than one college. Once you hear back from all of the schools to which you applied, take time to re-evaluate which schools you are definitely still interested in. You may not even be interested in attending the school at which you have been wait-listed if you have already been accepted to your top choice school. Write out all of your potential schools and their corresponding decisions, with the schools that are priorities listed at the top. Once you determine your college priorities, then you can decide how to further pursue (or not pursue) schools to which you have been wait-listed.

    2. Respond honestly
    Most colleges give the option for wait-listed applicants to either accept his or her position on the wait list or deny it. Look back on your list of prioritized schools, and if one of the schools to which you are wait-listed remains a priority school, accept your status on the wait list quickly. On the other hand, if you are no longer realistically interested in your wait list options, then simply don’t accept the position on the wait list. If the college does not give the option to accept a position on the wait list, then you can always call the admissions office and withdraw your application as a wait-list candidate. This honesty will help you come to a decision about where you will ultimately enroll, and it will also help the schools consider students who are actually interested in attending their school.

    3. Send relevant updates
    Your first reflex when you get accepted on to a college wait list may be to send weekly letters to the admissions office expressing your deep and undying love for the school. Try your best to keep communication with the admissions office sparing (no more than once or twice per month), and only send update letters if you do in fact have new information for the admissions office. For example, if you have contributed to a recent publication or you have a further letter of recommendation that was not included in your initial application, it would be appropriate to contact and update the office. Also keep in mind that you should abide by all communication protocols set by the admissions office. For example, if the admissions office has a general phone number or e-mail contact, communicate with them through that listed contact information. It is against your best interest to look up admissions staff and reach out to them individually, as you could come across as nosy and pretentious.

    4. Relax
    There is really only so much you can do to get off of a college wait list. It is ultimately out of your hands whether you will be accepted into the school. Do your best to organize yourself, communicate effectively with the admissions office, and fulfill any deadlines associated with being on the wait list. Do not over-stress yourself, as your anxiety will not positively impact your chances of getting off the wait list. Instead, use that energy to make the best out of your situation and embrace any schools that have initially accepted you.